NOTES FOR CHAPTER 8

Edward Coles to Thomas Sloo--The letter can be found in Clarence Alvord, Governor Edward Coles, Illinois Historical Society Library, 1920, p. 289. Back

Actually, Coles resided--Almanac Dates, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Back

His duties--Coles describes them in a letter to his mother and sister dated February 4, 1810 (Historical Society of Pennsylvania). See also Katherine Anthony, Dolly Madison: Her Life and Times, Garden City, 1949, p. 204. Back

only 126 federal employees--Frederick L. Fishback, "Washington City, Its Founding and Development," Columbia Historical Society Records, XX (1917), 194-224. Back

His correspondence in these years--Coles also offered appointments to well-known political figures and received their replies. For instance, included in the Coles correspondence is a letter from Joseph Storey thanking Coles for a letter of nomination to the Supreme Court (Joseph Storey to Edward Coles, November 23, 1811, Princeton University Library). There is also a letter from Richard Rush expressing uncertainty as to whether to accept the appointment to comptroller of the treasury (Richard Rush to Edward Coles, November 25, 1811, Princeton University Library). Back

Robert Fulton writes--Robert Fulton to Edward Coles, January 17, 1815, Princeton University Library. Back

If there be no impropriety--William Pinckney to Edward Coles, undated, Princeton University Library. Back

While I was in Philadelphia--Edward Coles to Dolley Madison, June 10, 1811, New York Public Library. Back

Thus suddenly and strangely--William B. Coles, ed., The Coles Family of Virginia, New York, 1931, p. 119. Back

which will give a fine appearance--D.B. Warden, A Chorographical and Statistical Description of the District of Columbia, Paris, 1816, pp. 33-34. Back

One scholar sees--James S. Young, The Washington Community, 1800-1828, New York, 1966, pp. 1-10. Back

the population of Washington--The 1810 figure is from Warden, p. 24, and the 1800 figure is from Fishback, p. 205. Back

the city of magnificent distances--H. Paul Caemmerer, A Manual on the Origin and Development of Washington, Washington, D.C., 1939, p. 40. Back

In going to assemblies--Sir Augustus John Foster, Jeffersonian America: Notes on the United States Collected in the Years 1805-6-7 and 11-12, San Marino, CA, 1954, p. 86. Back

In fancy now--Warden, p. 31. Back

Born in Virginia--The information contained in this discussion of Dolley Madison's life can be found in any standard biography of Dolley Madison. See especially, Katherine Anthony, Dolly Madison: Her Life and Times, Garden City, 1949; Ethel Arnett, Mrs. James Madison: The Incomparable Dolley, Greensboro, 1972; and Maud Goodwin, Dolly Madison, New York, 1896. Note that the spelling of Dolley's first name varies. Back

of slight figure--Arnett, p. 36, quoting a contemporary account. Back

Dear friend, thou must come to me--Ibid., p. 57. Back

he was indebted--Edward Coles to H.B. Grigsby, December 23, 1854, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. For a matchmaking letter from Uncle Isaac's wife Catherine to Dolley, see Arnett, p. 61. Back

in the course of this day--Arnett, p. 65. Back

Madison for the rest of his life--Ibid., pp. 61-62. Back

Mrs. Madison is a fine--Goodwin, p. 141. Back

the drawing room--Margaret Bayard Smith, The First Forty Years of Washington Society, ed. Galliard Hunt, New York, 1906, p. 94. Back

in her hands--Arnett, p. 182. Back

I think there is some danger--Dolley Madison to Edward Coles, June 15, 1811, Private Collection of Mr. and Mrs. George B. Cutts (copy in the University of Virginia Library). Back

there are none--Dolley Madison to Edward Coles, May 13, 1813, Private Collection of Charles Feinberg (copy in the University of Virginia Library). Back

Present my respects--Edward Coles to Dolley Madison, June 10, 1811, New York Public Library. Back

We indulge this pleasing hope--Dolley Madison to Edward Coles, May 13, 1813, Private Collection of Charles Feinberg (copy in the University of Virginia Library). Back

His principles were sound--1844 autobiography, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Back

Charles Ingersoll recalls Coles--Arnett, p. 98. Back

Mr. Madison, I think--Paul Jennings, A Colored Man's Reminiscences of James Madison, Brooklyn, 1865, p. 17. Back

from the force of early impressions--1844 autobiography, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Back

Mr. Madison's treatment of me--Ibid. Back

The task of abolishing--James Madison to Thomas Hertell, December 20, 1809, University of Virginia Library. Back

You are pursuing--James Madison to Edward Coles, September 3, 1819, Princeton University Library. Back

Edward Coles

Chapter 8